Sixth History and Culture Summit slated for Oct. 24-25

If you go

History and Culture Summit

When: 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 24, and 8 a.m. to 4:20 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 25.

Where: Grand Ronde Tribal gym, 9615 Grand Ronde Road. Breakfast and lunch will be provided. Attendees also can register for a dinner at achaf-hammi on Wednesday evening.

More information: 503-879-1674 or at HCSummit@grandronde.org.

 

By Danielle Frost

The Grand Ronde History and Culture Summit is gearing up for its sixth year on Wednesday and Thursday, Oct. 24-25.

This year’s summit will host presentations from Tribal staff and partners that focus on building and maintaining partnerships through projects to encourage the growth of cultural awareness, said Tribal Senior Archaeologist Jessica Curteman, who is the event organizer.

“Attendees will have an opportunity to view ‘The Rise of the Collectors’ exhibit and interact in smaller groups with hands-on activities and discussions at the Chachalu Museum & Cultural Center,” she said.

Last year, the summit attracted some 250 people from across the state, ranging from Tribal members to cultural resource firms and educators.

Organizers are hoping that 2018 brings even more attendees to soak up Grand Ronde Tribal culture and to leave with the sense that it is both rich in tradition and very much alive today.

So far, more than 150 people have pre-registered for the event, and the Cultural Resources Department is accepting registrations up to the morning of the summit.

The summit will begin with a light breakfast at 8 a.m. both days, followed by an opening ceremony and presentations in the Tribal gym. After lunch, events will continue in the gym and at the Tribe’s museum, Chachalu, 8720 Grand Ronde Road. A dinner at achaf-hammi, the Tribal plankhouse near Uyxat Powwow Grounds off Hebo Road, will be held Wednesday at 5:30 p.m.

The summit began in 2013 as a means to help remedy that the histories of Oregon’s Tribes had not been properly documented.  

“The History and Culture Summit highlights the Tribe's relationships, places and practices throughout its lands,” Curteman said. “(It) supports a healthy community and promotion of Tribal lifeways through presentations of current research, leading hands-on activities and cultivating community outreach. We encourage people to come and learn about current projects and future opportunities.”